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Tour

Below is some sight-seeing places' information for your reference. Detailed one-day tour route will be shown in the program updated in Mid. June, 2017. (Attention: there might be some changes for the visiting places)

Introduction for some sight-seeing places in Singapore

Merlion Park

Half-fish and half-lion, the iconic Merlion resides at the waterfront Merlion Park. You’ve probably seen images of Singapore’s national icon, the mythical Merlion with the head of a lion and the body of a fish. The body symbolises Singapore's humble beginnings as a fishing village when it was called Temasek, meaning 'sea town' in Old Javanese. Its head represents Singapore’s original name, Singapura, or ‘lion city’ in Malay. Today, you can glimpse this legend at Merlion Park. Spouting water from its mouth, the Merlion statue stands tall at 8.6 metres and weighs 70 tonnes. This icon is a ‘must-see’ for tourists visiting Singapore, similar to other significant landmarks around the world. Built by local craftsman Lim Nang Seng, it was unveiled on 15 September 1972 by then Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew at the mouth of the Singapore River, to welcome all visitors to Singapore.

Esplanade-Theatres on the Bay

This boldly designed performing arts center has become a memorable part of Singapore’s skyline. Locals have dubbed them "the Durian", as the twin structures resemble the spiky tropical fruit that is unique to this part of the world. And as with the strong, some might say pungent, smelling national fruit of Singapore, every Singaporean has an opinion about the bold design of Esplanade. Love it or not, the space has become synonymous with the country, a funky complement to the symmetry of Marina Bay Sands and the Singapore Flyer that sit nearby. Designed by leading local firm DP Architects, the space features a 1,600-seat Concert Hall where the Singapore Symphony Orchestra and other local, regional and international music acts regularly perform.

Gardens by the Bay

This sprawling garden in the city provides mesmerising waterfront views across three gardens, spanning over 101 hectares of reclaimed land. Located next to Marina Reservoir, Gardens by the Bay offers breath-taking waterfront views. This multi-award winning horticultural destination spans 101 hectares of reclaimed land, and is made up of two main areas – Bay South Garden and Bay East Garden. Bay South Garden is the largest of the gardens. Inspired by an orchid, the design resembles Singapore’s national flower, Vanda ‘Miss Joaquim’. You can’t miss the massive Supertrees here. These tree-shaped vertical gardens are between nine to 16 storeys tall. Walk on the suspended walkway between two Supertrees to enjoy a bird’s eye view of the gardens. In the evening, catch the sky show of choreographed lights and sounds at the Garden Rhapsody amidst the Supertrees. The natural beauty of the gardens translates indoors. Dine in style at a range of eateries across the gardens, from casual cafes to posh restaurants, all with interiors designed to reflect the splendour of Gardens by the Bay.

Chinatown

Singapore’s historic Chinatown is a bustling mix of old and new, filled with traditional shops and markets as well as cool stores and cafes. The cramped five-foot-ways, dingy alleys and raucous street hawkers are relics of Chinatown’s past. Yet pockets of history remain in Chinatown, along with more modern sights. You could easily spend a few days wandering through these still-narrow streets. Family-run goldsmiths, medicinal halls and teahouses ply their trades next to sleeker neighbours such as hipster bars and lifestyle shops. If you’re a foodie, try 'char kway teow' (stir-fried noodles) and 'satay' (barbecued meat skewers) at Chinatown Food Street, a row of hawker stalls, shophouse restaurants and kiosks along Smith Street. For trendier tastes, chic restaurants and bars are in Neil Road, Duxton Road and Keong Saik Road. The vibe is electric in Club Street and Ann Siang Road on Friday and Saturday nights, when locals and expats head down for dinner and drinks. And we will have lunch here, and you could enjoy any food you are interested in here

Little India

Little India is a buzzing historic area that shows off the best of Singapore’s Indian community from vibrant culture to incredible shopping. You may not know that Little India once had a racecourse, cattle herders and brick kilns. But while these places and people are gone, time stands still in pockets of this historic district. Olden-day trades sit next to newer businesses: flower-garland vendors, modern eateries, boutique hotels, as well as arts groups. In the 1840s, Europeans lived here mainly for the racecourse, where they met and mingled. When cattle trading took root, it became a mostly Indian trade as traders hired Indian migrant workers. Certain goods and services took off, and mosques and Hindu temples were built. Little India today is one of Singapore’s most vibrant districts. As you walk down Serangoon Road and neighbouring streets, explore their mix of Hindu and Chinese temples, mosques and churches. Fill your tummy with South Indian vegetarian food, North Indian tandoori dishes and local fare like roti prata (round pancakes) and teh tarik (pulled tea in Malay). Try to spot the brewers ‘pull’ the hot milk tea – it’s amazing showmanship. Don’t forget to shop. The 24-hour shopping mall Mustafa Centre offers everything from electronics to groceries, or take your pick from open-air Tekka Centre, goldsmith shops and sari stores.


 

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